05 May 2009

Writing on Reading: The Thousandfold Thought


R. Scott Bakker's The Thousandfold Thought is the third and "final" book in the Prince of Nothing series, which begins with The Darkness that Comes Before. As I indicated in my review of The Darkness . . . Bakker created an original and interesting world for this series. However, The Thousandfold Thought makes we wonder if the world is too complex or if, perhaps, I'm not bright enough to grasp it on first reading. One clue about the complexity of the book is that the glossary at the end is almost 100 pages long! Forgive me for not wanting to remember or look up all that information simply to follow the story.

For me, The Thousandfold Thought was disappointing. I became so lost about who was doing what that the motives of the various characters--especially the main character--became unclear. Also, my expectations about what the end of the series would be like were not met. The "payoff" at the end of the 1,500 page series was not big enough. Apparently, I need to read the next series to get the payoff I thought I'd get in this one. The first book in the new series just came out. Maybe I'll get to it someday . . .

5 comments:

fairyhedgehog said...

I absolutely hate books that don't provide a satisfactory ending because another book is coming along. Fantasy is the worst offender for this and it drives me crazy.

lesleylsmith said...

I totally agree with you, fairyhedgehog! Thanks for the warning, Editor Dave. ;)

Boudica said...

I was disappointed with the Thousand Fold Thought as well. The Darkness that Comes Before was amazing and I think it is one of the best books I've ever read.

I wonder if there's anything in my theory that first books are often better because an author spends years getting them good enough to get published. Then when they have a book deal they only have a year or so to get the next one out - and it suffers because not so much time is given to it.

sex scenes at starbucks said...

I should write a review of The Darkness That Comes Before, because I'm a dissenter in this crowd!

Boudica,

I think that theory holds water, sometimes. It depends on a number of factors.

David E. Hughes said...

I agree there's something to Boudica's theory, but I also think there are other issues involved. Sometimes authors get good at setting up threads but then have a hard time tying them up. Robert Jordan is a good example. I really liked "Eye of the Word" but I think the books in that series got worse as they went on.